Don’t overeat after your workout

Ads:

Individuals will usually overestimate the number of calories they will burn off while working out. If you overestimate the calories burnt off during exercising, you might consume a lot more than you can afford to, making weight reduction and maintenance challenging.

High-intensity workouts might cause you to consume a lot more food due to the rigors it will put your body through.  You might fall into the trap of eating too much because your body is depleted. A better option might be doing a moderate exercise so you can still burn off the the calories, and be able to replenish yourself  with a lower caloric meal.

Look at the chart below from the CDC to determine how many average calories you consume during everyday activities and workouts.

You will discover just how simple it is to obliterate the calories expended during an exercise routine with merely a few extra bites throughout the day.  Don’t ruin all your hard work by not tracking your calories consumed versus your daily activity for each day.

How many calories are used in typical activities?

The following table shows calories used in common physical activities at both moderate and vigorous levels.

Calories Used per Hour in Common Physical Activities
Moderate Physical Activity
Approximate Calories/30 Minutes for a 154 lb Person1
Approximate Calories/Hr for a 154 lb Person1
Hiking
185
370
Light gardening/yard work
165
330
Dancing
165
330
Golf (walking and carrying clubs)
165
330
Bicycling (<10 mph)
145
290
Walking (3.5 mph)
140
280
Weight lifting (general light workout)
110
220
Stretching
90
180
Vigorous Physical Activity
Approximate Calories/30 Minutes for a 154 lb Person1
Approximate Calories/Hr for a 154 lb Person1
Running/jogging (5 mph)
295
590
Bicycling (>10 mph)
295
590
Swimming (slow freestyle laps)
255
510
Aerobics
240
480
Walking (4.5 mph)
230
460
Heavy yard work (chopping wood)
220
440
Weight lifting (vigorous effort)
220
440
Basketball (vigorous)
220
440
1 Calories burned per hour will be higher for persons who weigh more than 154 lbs (70 kg) and lower for persons who weigh less.
Source: Adapted from Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005, page 16, Table 4.

 

 © 2015 by Diettips.net.  All rights reserved.

(Visited 27 times, 1 visits today)

Your rating: none
Rating: 5 - 1 votes

Author: Editor

Share This Post On

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *